Past Life Memories of Culloden…

Culloden is very close to my heart. If you’ve read my past life story you’ll understand why. I’ve lived here for the greater part of my life, in a little spot by the woods between Culloden House and Culloden Battlefield.

I visit the Battlefield often. It’s not only somewhere I visit regularly on our tours, it’s somewhere I go just to ‘be’ sometimes. Just to walk, to think, to be silent…

Andy and I also go there early on either Christmas or New Year’s Day morning just to walk together in the silence too. It’s beautiful there on those days, so peaceful…

There is something so special about the Highlands, particularly Culloden. It’s like the earth somehow reaches up and touches me. I can’t imagine not living here.

I can remember walking this land in the 18th century. I can remember walking through old Inverness, marching towards Culloden House as it was back then. I can remember standing in the grounds of Culloden House before the battle, looking around at the men, weary and exhausted, laid around the grounds. I can distinctly remember feeling a sense of utter hopelessness, and that was a memory that burned deep into my soul. I can remember the time after the battle, feeling afraid and cold, not only for myself, but for my Clansmen and my family.

Quite often I have ‘glitches’ in time. I can be walking along and suddenly for as many as ten or more seconds, I step back in time, I am him again, standing in the same spot, only 270 years earlier. Yet it’s still me. It’s my eyes I experience him through, my consciousness. Memories from that life are no different to memories from this one.

I dream of his daily life often at night. I have done for 2 years now – hundreds of nights of vivid, clear dreams of my daily life back in the 18th century. Not every day was taken up with battles. I know the paths I walked, the places I frequented, the buildings I visited and the people I knew. I have stood before many things that I have seen through the same eyes centuries ago. It feels completely natural to be there, seeing them again. In my dreams, I remember as much of what it meant to be him and to have lived his life, as I do of this life now and what it means to be the woman I am now.

We have little more than an inkling of who we really are deep down, and just how deep we go…

For me, and I know for many others, Culloden Battlefield has a draw that is very difficult to explain in words. It is somewhere I had to return to again in this lifetime.

Past life memories have been a normal part of my life since the age of nine. I believe we experience many lives, not just one or two. I also believe we can meet some of the same souls through various lifetimes, like a soul-mate family. These are people we are energetically tied to who will show up in many guises and roles through our various lifetimes, just as we will in theirs. When I became qualified in delivering past life regression (a gentle form of hypnotherapy which allows you to access your subconscious memories) many years ago, I knew that it was going to be one of the greatest privileges of my life to assist others through the archaeology of their soul. I also knew without doubt that I wouldn’t be the only person to have this inextricable tie to Scotland, this yearning, a bond so great that it’s impossible to explain.

Since sharing my past life story and including past life regression as part of our tours, we’ve drawn many clients who also have a strong and inextricable pull to this powerful place. Over the years I’ve regressed many people, and I’ve been blessed to walk the battlefield in this lifetime with a handful of people who were also here on that fateful day in 1746. Walking the battlefield with them after their regression is quite a surreal experience. With others, I’ve heard how their lives were deeply affected by the consequences of the battle, and others who can remember being here in Scotland. This is not and never was just a job. It’s everything I’d ever hoped to achieve by ‘coming home’. Souls reunited with a common purpose – to come to this beautiful place to heal wounds that their soul refuses to forget…

Aye, she is a deeply precious place, Culloden.

Leanach Cottage

This beautiful little blackhouse survived the Battle of Culloden and has stood on the battlefield since the early 18th century, though parts of the cottage have fallen to ruin and have been rebuilt over the years. In August 2018 the cottage was re-thatched. We stopped to chat with the gentleman doing the thatching and he explained to us that it was being thatched with heather, glorious pink heather. He said that in his 20 years of thatching, only 3% of cottages are done in heather.

The finished cottage a couple of weeks after being re-thatched, and the pink colour is beginning to subside. Doesn’t she look beautiful…

In this photo below from the early 20th century, Belle MacDonald stands in front of Leanach Cottage at Culloden Battlefield. Belle was the last occupant of the cottage until her death 1912 and she, and her family before her, used to guide people around the battlefield.

We had a really interesting experience on Culloden Battlefield one morning in October 2018. We arrived with out tour guests first thing in the morning in sunshine. While we were at the Cairn, a mist rolled in at the pace of a man running. The mist moved only up the Jacobite line, along the path which follows the blue flags and the Clan markers. If you’ve visited the battlefield you’ll know the path. All of a sudden the mist changed direction, and began ‘charging’ diagonally across the battlefield in exactly the same direction as the Jacobites had at the time of the battle. We stood there in awe, watching what looked liked hundreds of ghosts literally charging in front of us. We managed to capture it on video, so it’s below for you.

I made this short video summer 2018 as a way of explaining what the battlefield means to me. My husband Andy is the Jacobite, and it’s called ‘The Ghosts of Culloden’.

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